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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 8
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15
forcing tens of thousands of people to evacuate. this is the morning news. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time however he likes. new zealand! xarelto® is just one pill a day, taken with the evening meal. and with no dietary restrictions, bob can eat the healthy foods he likes. do not stop taking xarelto® rivaroxaban
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
, if it isn't mr. margin. mr. margin? don't be modest, bob. you found a better way to pack a bowling ball. that was ups. and who called ups? you did, bob. i just asked a question. it takes a long time to pack a bowling ball. the last guy pitched more ball packers. but you... you consulted ups. you found a better way. that's logistics. that's margin. find out what else ups knows. i'll do that. you're on a roll. that's funny. i wasn't being funny, bob. i know. >>> egyptians went to the polls over the week jenld, and preliminary results show that 64% voted in favor of the new constitution. egypt's leading opposition party is appealing the results of the latest votes. >> reporter: while we're expecting the official results for egypt's constitutionreferen, the battle is over. the umbrella organization for the opposition has filed two legal challenges. the first one looks aat the irregularities they say took place during two days of voting. the second one aattacks the constitutional referendum itself when they call illegal because it does not follow the specific guidelines previously set out. w
's not even bob dole's treaty, although he certainly is a person who has been deeply involved. the vote on the treaty is the right thing to do on its merits. i think that it's important to note that every major veterans' group -- madam president, i ask that the list of the veterans' groups in support be included in the record at this time. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: i've not forgotten that 36 republicans signed a letter opposing consideration of any treaty during the lame duck, but there's no reason why we shouldn't have a vote on this. the letter says that they would oppose consideration, but we did have the motion to proceed. some may be worried about passing a treaty in a lame-duck session. the argument has no basis in the constitution or the senate practice. since the 1970's alone the senate has approved treaties during lame-duck sessions a total of 19 times. there's nothing special or different about lame-duck sessions. i'd like to address a few of the misconceptions about the treaty that i keep hearing. it's true that the treaty establishes a committee,
's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do you want the jobs or do you not want the jobs? >> and that plays out all over the south in harold's home state of tennessee, auto plant comes back, you get a bunch of jobs but at a very low wage. so the question is do you want to lower ourselves to the global standard of wages so that you have many more jobs -- >> that's a better option. >> that question has to be answered -- >> stronger middle class in union s
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
or the other. all they're trying to do is protect their interests. host: bob is in barrington, illinois on our republican line. caller: on the matter of immigration, i live in illinois. illegals are not allowed in the .tate to have driver's licenses what is going on with our country? we have the most corrupt politicians in the united states in this state. everyone knows what is going on. they are selling our state out to the illegals and i am upset with it. if somebody breaks in my house, i'm not going to give them a bed and roof over their head. i'm going to put them in jail or kick him out of the country. host: bob, does the illinois state department of motor vehicles rulebook still say, must read, write, understand english? caller: no, i have not seen it in there. the should have kept that in there. i was in japan for four years. their rules are a lot tougher hours. we had to carry id's around. -- around 24/7. host: what kind of work did you do in barrington, illinois? caller: i worked all over. if i want to find a part-time job, it is hard. the minute they look at her white hair, they say
blumenthal and chris murphy. at 4:00, "face the nation." bob schieffer talks with governor molloy and paul vance. chuck schumer of new york and kay bailey, from texas. these are brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. the rearing begins at noon eastern. at 3:00, listened to them all on c-span radio. -- listen to them all on c-span radio. you can listen on your smart phone or online. caller: my inspiration was -- [video clip] >> my inspiration was the archives and documents about the cold war. talking about roosevelt, stalin, churchill, we know the main events from our point of view. i wanted to show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? how did they behave? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonigh
the same thing from bob king from the united auto workers yesterday, giving same lack of specifics. only broad concepts they're looking to challenge right to work laws in court. they will go after the speed which the laws moved through the legislature. democrats and union political machines will go after republicans in elections in 2014. they are looking to change the majority that the gop holds in both the senate and the house here in michigan. and they're looking to prove that theory. once you go after organized labor that is like kicking hornet's nest. we see the democratic leadership in meets, not telling what is going on in the meetings, only promising this is not the end of this fight, jenna. jenna: hornet's nest indeed. mike tobin covering the breaking details over the last several days for us. meantime congressman levin will join us later on this hour. he is a democrat from michigan. he has been the at forefront of labor issues in that state since the 1960s. he is obviously against what happened in the state government. we'll talk to him a little bit what is next and what does it
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole. we became friends. when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said i am going to be a county clerk, after that i will run for the state house and when there is an opening in congress, that is where i will go. i said, that is a good idea. i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor. when the territory office became available, i ran for that office. when state could came along, i got to congress. -- statehood came along, i got to congress. >> you were in the territorial legislature before you got here. >> two terms in the house and a term in the senate. sparks then you came here as a member of the house. who did you come here with it? >> only one member. you mentioned senator dole and the fact you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing how some of these relationships were formed before public service. the senator from wyoming house and senate and meeting him when he was a boy scout together. you have a relationship with bob dole. >> the other is phil. the hospital is n
to the top republicans since 1986, serving republican leader bob michael, newt gingrich, speaker hastert and john boehner and floor assistant as the general clerk for republican leader john rose and assist ant manager for the republican cloakroom. his experience has been invaluable to all of us who serve here in the house of representatives. jay is known for his vast knowledge of the rules, for his vast knowledge of the traditions and history and the procedures of the house of representatives. and he has been a teacher and a coach to so many members of the congress over the years and we're grateful to his dedication and that he has given this institution over the past 34 years. jay was born in santa barbara, california and graduated from westmont college. jay has a master's degree and pd in english literature. he and his wife have two grown sons, joel and jay. jay is a man of faith and he has his party in the right place. several years ago, he said politics must be secondary to faith and to life. ultimate answers don't lie in politic. no matter what we do or legislate, we won't solve the
take responsibility for it. i can remember bob michael former republican leader in the house saying i'm proud of voting for this. if you want a two bit congressman vote for somebody else. he kept getting reelected. host: john now on the democratic line. caller: good morning. thanks for having me on. my main thing is saying i think the problem is our g.d.p. we don't produce anything. we don't create any jobs. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the countr
that will be up on the hill headed by bob adams. several others will be joining. thank you so much for joining us today. if you have any questions, please stick around and ask. thank you very much. >> thank you so much. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> up next on c-span, today's house debate on the fiscal cliff. then, chris van hollen. >> the senate's all -- the senate small business committee holds a hearing on the hurricanes and the response -- hurricane sandy response. live coverage at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span 3 and c- span.org. >> i wanted to explain how totalitarianism happens. we have seen the documents of cold war. roosevelt, stalin, churchill, truman. we know the main events from our point of view. -- point of view. what i wanted to do a show from a different angle, from the ground up. what did it feel like to be the people who were subjected to the system? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region we used to call europe has been very differentiated. these countries longer have much in common with each other -- no longer have much in common with each other. . -- sunda
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15